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http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/fe/missingCoverArtPlaceholder.jpg Sisterworld

Liars

Sisterworld

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5 3 0
April 8, 2010

After tearing up the New York post-punk scene in the early 2000s, the Liars reappeared as Berlin electronic experimentalists and L.A. industrial groove things. Their fifth album lays claim to L.A.'s pulpy occult mythos with glowering noise brutalism and evil chant-singing that suggest TV on the Radio as a hippie death cult. Angus Andrew intimates violence everywhere: There are dead-souled stoners on "The Overachievers," and he's blasé "counting victims one by one" on "Here Comes All the People." Some Velvets-style beauty surfaces near the album's end, but the sense of comfort collapses into "Too Much, Too Much," a song welcoming death.

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