.
http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/73b50c775e5e88d29b83852f0083309cb234b75b.jpeg Shango

Santana

Shango

Rolling Stone: star rating
Community: star rating
5 2 0
October 14, 1982

Carlos Santana once likened his penchant for exploring different musical genres to a mountain climber's obsession with mountains. So long as part of a mountain range — or the musical equivalent — lies uncharted, there remains a challenge to be met. Over the course of fourteen albums, Santana and the various versions of his band have indeed explored many areas of contemporary music. The music on Shangó, much like the group's 1981 smash, Zebop!, ranges from Latino chants and instrumentals to near-jazz — here, with a bit more synthesized polish to it — to rock, including an upbeat cover of Junior Walker's "What Does It Take (to Win Your Love)." As usual, the percussion section churns impeccably and Santana's guitar-playing shines.

There is a cost to Carlos Santana's eclecticism, however, and it is evident on Shangó. Precisely because he has chosen no distinct stylistic route for his band, the music often lacks distinction altogether. At times, in fact, the playing seems so formulaic Santana could easily be mistaken for one of the faceless bands that now dominate the airwaves. Santana may be winning new fans and airplay with this sort of musical potpourri, but he's not reaching any new musical peaks.

prev
Album Review Main Next

ADD A COMMENT

Community Guidelines »
loading comments

loading comments...

COMMENTS

Sort by:
    Read More
    Around the Web
    Powered By ZergNet
    Daily Newsletter

    Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

    Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
    marketing partners.

    X

    We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

    Song Stories

    “Bird on a Wire”

    Leonard Cohen | 1969

    While living on the Greek island of Hydra, Cohen was battling a lingering depression when his girlfriend handed him a guitar and suggested he play something. After spotting a bird on a telephone wire, Cohen wrote this prayer-like song of guilt. First recorded by Judy Collins, it would be performed numerous times by artists incuding Johnny Cash, Joe Cocker and Rita Coolidge. "I'm always knocked out when I hear my songs covered or used in some situation," Cohen told Rolling Stone. "I've never gotten over the fact that people out there like my music."

    More Song Stories entries »
    www.expandtheroom.com