.
http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/c3e59cf62524a486029edeb50d89fca79a404c69.jpg Shake/Shiver/Moan

22-20s

Shake/Shiver/Moan

TBD Records
Rolling Stone: star rating
Community: star rating
5 3 0
June 22, 2010

This U.K. group's 2004 debut was then-trendy blues punk, the kind of sound a band can mine every year or so until it splits up or gets some new influences. Weirdly, both of those things happened. It's taken a breakup and reunion for the 22-20s to record a follow-up, and now you can hear Sixties psych rock and Nineties Brit pop in their sound. They're best when their throwbacks clash; "Ocean" is the best Byrds tune Oasis never wrote, and on "Let It Go," singer Martin Trimble does a great stoned, ruffle-sleeved Bono.

prev
Album Review Main Next

ADD A COMMENT

Community Guidelines »
loading comments

loading comments...

COMMENTS

Sort by:
    Read More
    Daily Newsletter

    Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

    Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
    marketing partners.

    X

    We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

    Song Stories

    “Road to Nowhere”

    Talking Heads | 1985

    A cappella harmonies give way to an a fuller arrangement blending pop and electro-disco on "Road to Nowhere," but the theme remains constant: We're on an eternal journey to an undefined destination. The song vaulted back into the news a quarter century after it was a hit when Gov. Charlie Crist used it in his unsuccessful 2010 campaign for the U.S. Senate in Florida. "It's this little ditty about how there's no order and no plan and no scheme to life and death and it doesn't mean anything, but it's all right," Byrne said with a chuckle.

    More Song Stories entries »
    www.expandtheroom.com