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http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/254b327bc08643ece64f4e7cc0ef5d80fc9608a7.jpeg Sabotage

Black Sabbath

Sabotage

Universal Distribution
Rolling Stone: star rating
Community: star rating
5 0 0
September 25, 1975

Sabotage is not only Black Sabbath's best record since Paranoid, it might be their best ever. Even with the usual themes of death, destruction and mental illness running throughout this album, the unleashed frenzy and raw energy they've returned to here comes like a breath of fresh air.

"Symptom of the Universe" rambles on, an atonal riff-based crusher, then shifts for a coda of lightly paced acoustic jamming. "Megalomania" is an inversion of that, erupting into a hard rocker with a hummable chorus before it's slammed home in a quake of phasing and feedback. For diversion, there's "Supertzar," which features the English Chamber Choir chanting off an off-time splurge of guitar phrases. Black Sabbath loyalists will no doubt love this record and those who've never bothered may even want to indulge.

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