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http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/rich-gang-1378747924.jpg Rich Gang

Rich Gang

Rich Gang

Cash Money/Universal
Rolling Stone: star rating
Community: star rating
5 2 0
September 9, 2013

In recent years, New Orleans sister labels Cash Money and Young Money have turned into one of hip-hop's most reliable hit factories, thanks to superstars like Nicki Minaj, Lil Wayne and Drake. On this celebratory all-star compilation, Nicky and Weezy (but not Drizzy) are joined by CMYM bench contributors (Cory Gunz, Limp Bizkit, Ace Hood, Mack Maine, Tyga) and non-label heavies (Flo Rida, Rick Ross, Kendrick Lamar, R. Kelly and Chris Brown) for a crowded disc of Maybach waxing and club banging. Lamar drops a marvelously bendy verse on "100 Flavors" and hungry old-timers Mystikal and Busta Rhymes do some gonzo barking on the slippery yacht-rock jam "Everyday." Mostly, though, it's like a crowded party where you don't really get to talk to anyone as long as you'd like.

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