.
http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/763e362b30d7c5f0eab500bbb869b45ab592b41b.jpg Reflections

Jerry Garcia

Reflections

Rolling Stone: star rating
Community: star rating
5 0 0
June 3, 1976

Let's put it this way. You'd have to be a real fan of, say, Ted Nugent to plunk down five bucks to hear him do an album of his favorite Joan Baez ballads. Similarly, you'd have to be a Jerry Garcia maniac to want to hear the one-time king of the cyberjam play an album full of plodders like Reflections. This is an odd album, occasionally approaching a country twinge (as on "Might as Well") or even coming dangerously close to toe-tapping boogie. Most of the music here is lethargic ballad material like "I'll Take a Melody" or "It Must Have Been the Roses," and it never shows enough energy to get you up and moving.

Garcia's guitar playing never produces the old fire, although it occasionally hints at the stylistic rolling gait of the Dead's golden years. Reflections features an all-star cast (Weir, Lesh, Hopkins, Hart, Kreutzmann), but all that proves is that big names don't necessarily make a big album.

prev
Album Review Main Next

ADD A COMMENT

Community Guidelines »
loading comments

loading comments...

COMMENTS

Sort by:
    Read More
    Around the Web
    Powered By ZergNet
    Daily Newsletter

    Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

    Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
    marketing partners.

    X

    We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

    Song Stories

    “Hungry Like the Wolf”

    Duran Duran | 1982

    This indulgent New Romantic group generated their first U.S. hit with the help of what was at the time new technology. "Simon [Le Bon] and I, I think, had been out the night before and had this terrible hangover," said keyboardist Nick Rhodes. "For some reason we were feeling guilty about it and decided to go and do some work." Rhodes started playing with his Jupiter-8 synth, and then "Simon had an idea for a lyric, and by lunchtime when everyone else turned up, we pretty much had the song." The Simmons drumbeat was equally important to the sound of "Hungry Like the Wolf," as Duran Duran drummer Roger Taylor stated it "kind of defined the drum sound for the Eighties."

    More Song Stories entries »
    www.expandtheroom.com