.
http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/623ededdfa4f1348de06cfde10863191ce2cc5f4.jpg R.E.M. Live

R.E.M.

R.E.M. Live

Warner Bros.
Rolling Stone: star rating
Community: star rating
5 3.5 0
November 15, 2007

R.E.M.'s first live album — a CD/DVD combo recorded on their 2005 tour — is, if you are a real purist, two decades late. The band never released a full concert record with original drummer Bill Berry. But while this set goes back to 1984's Reckoning, Live is as much about forward motion as the records singer Michael Stipe, guitarist Peter Buck and bassist Mike Mills have made since Berry left in 1997. In fact, songs that seemed overpolished on those albums — "Leaving New York," from Around the Sun; Up's "Walk Unafraid" — bloom in the electric momentum of live performance. Armed with the extra jangle of guitarist Scott McCaughey and the firm propulsion of drummer Bill Rieflin, R.E.M. are still one of rock's great live experiences, and old standbys like "The One I Love" sound born to bruise. There is a new song too, "I'm Gonna DJ," a rough blast of triumph — "I'm gonna DJ at the end of the world!" Stipe crows — that augurs well for the road ahead.

prev
Album Review Main Next

ADD A COMMENT

Community Guidelines »
loading comments

loading comments...

COMMENTS

Sort by:
    Read More
    Daily Newsletter

    Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

    Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
    marketing partners.

    X

    We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

    Song Stories

    “Vicious”

    Lou Reed | 1972

    Opening Lou Reed's 1972 solo album, the hard-riffing "Vicious" actually traces its origin back to Reed's days with the Velvet Underground. Picking up bits and pieces of songs from the people and places around him, and filing his notes for later use, Reed said it was Andy Warhol who provided fuel for the song. "He said, 'Why don't you write a song called 'Vicious,'" Reed told Rolling Stone in 1989. "And I said, 'What kind of vicious?' 'Oh, you know, vicious like I hit you with a flower.' And I wrote it down literally."

    More Song Stories entries »
    www.expandtheroom.com