.
http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/317a1ed83d25bfc9ce2c0c06bc6456754675200a.jpg Pixies

Pixies

Pixies

Cooking Vinyl Records
Rolling Stone: star rating
Community: star rating
5 3 0
July 2, 2002

In 1987, back when alt-rock was called "college rock," the Pixies loomed large, like a bizarre crossbreeding of pop sensibilities, art-rock conceptualism and nasty guitar riffs. The elements of their sound — songwriter Black Francis' shrieking vocals, bassist Kim Deal's predatory bass lines, guitarist Joey Santiago's piercing leads and drummer David Lovering's unforgiving beats — were discernible, but they added up to something unprecedented and inexplicable, so fierce, and so weird. Their influence was far-reaching and disparate: Fans have included everyone from Kurt Cobain, who considered himself a Pixies rip-off artist, to Papa Roach, who cover the band's "Gouge Away" on their latest album. The Pixies' first record, an EP called Come On Pilgrim, comprised songs from an early Boston recording session. Pixies collects all the other songs taped in that session, most of which were later rerecorded and appeared on Pixies albums or singles. Even today, against a backdrop of rap rock and new metal, the frenzied riffs on "Broken Face" sound like really pissed-off birds; the previously unreleased "Rock A My Soul" screams, lurches and lives up to its title, and the prowling "Subbacultcha" resembles a recording of some sort of basement carnivore who just can't wait to eat live rockboy. The nine tracks on Pixies clock in at just over eighteen minutes, so the CD comes off as a sketch of an unvarnished, restless band, coolly bashing out its world-domination plan, standing on the verge of getting it on.

prev
Album Review Main Next

ADD A COMMENT

Community Guidelines »
loading comments

loading comments...

COMMENTS

Sort by:
    Read More
    Daily Newsletter

    Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

    Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
    marketing partners.

    X

    We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

    Song Stories

    “Bizness”

    Tune-Yards | 2011

    The opening track to Merrill Garbus’ second album under the Tune-Yards banner (she also plays in the trio Sister Suvi), “Bizness” is a song about relationships that is as colorful as the face paint favored by Garbus both live and in her videos. Disjointed funk bass, skittering African beats, diced-and-sliced horns and Garbus’ dynamic voice, which ranges from playful coos to throat-shredding howls, make “Bizness” reminiscent of another creative medium. “I'd like for them not to be songs as much as quilts or collages or something,” Garbus said.

    More Song Stories entries »
    www.expandtheroom.com