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http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/c7271219bf4861e19dc17bd126ae986a37dd930f.jpg Part Lies, Part Heart, Part Truth, Part Garbage

R.E.M.

Part Lies, Part Heart, Part Truth, Part Garbage

Warner Bros.
Rolling Stone: star rating
Community: star rating
5 4.5 0
11
November 15, 2011

Click to listen to R.E.M.'s 'We All Go Back To Where We Belong'

No better time than a breakup for a long goodbye: R.E.M.'s eighth compilation LP is a 40-song blowout. Chronological evenhandedness short-shrifts their vaunted 1980s but shows that their confused past 15 years did produce some Georgia peaches – see "Leaving New York" and "Überlin," which give the dreaminess of their early days a mournful cast. There are also three songs recorded after 2011's Collapse Into Now: "A Month of Saturdays" is Green-like dance rock; "We All Go Back to Where We Belong" goes to breakup-ballad heaven; and "Hallelujah" is a forlorn art-pop meltdown with Michael Stipe and Mike Mills sharing one last golden yodel before receding into the great beyond.  

Related
Rob Sheffield Says Goodbye to R.E.M.
• From Art School to Hall of Fame: R.E.M. Tours Through Their Discography
• R.E.M. in the Real World – Rolling Stone's 1987 Cover Story
R.E.M.'s 15 Greatest Videos

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