.
http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/1c6210527505c4aedb231bac76c855e861e55dfe.jpg Paris

The Cure

Paris

Elektra
Rolling Stone: star rating
Community: star rating
5 0 0
December 23, 1993

Two live albums is a lot of moping, but Robert Smith seems to relish every moment of Show and Paris. For 15 years a totem for trembling teens with high IQs and low self-esteem, Smith is the Cure-ator of a band that has built a museum of pretty misery. Particularly with their keyboard fills, they frame their trance-inducing songs with sharp, angular hooks; at pop for depressives, they rule. There's little apparent difference between these two career overviews: Both feature early, somber stuff ("Play for Today"), midperiod catchiness ("Let's Go to Bed") and recent radio masterstrokes ("Friday I'm in Love"). And in bulk, there's considerable fascination to this work: the faux-Middle Eastern exoticism of their swirling melodies; Smith's acid-muezzin wailing; all the black-velvet Byronic pain. Spooky.

prev
Album Review Main Next

ADD A COMMENT

Community Guidelines »
loading comments

loading comments...

COMMENTS

Sort by:
    Read More
    Around the Web
    Powered By ZergNet
    Daily Newsletter

    Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

    Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
    marketing partners.

    X

    We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

    Song Stories

    “You Oughta Know”

    Alanis Morissette | 1995

    This blunt, bitter breakup song -- famous for its line "Would she go down on you in a theater?" -- was long rumored to be about Alanis Morissette getting dumped by Full House actor Dave Coulier. But while she never confirmed it was about him (Coulier himself says it is, however), she insisted the song wasn't all about scorn. "By no means is this record just a sexual, angry record," she told Rolling Stone. "The song wasn't written for the sake of revenge. It was written for the sake of release. I'm actually a pretty rational, calm person."

    More Song Stories entries »
    www.expandtheroom.com