.
http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/3e824f1f59ff9bd0b01db84dc380ad3feeeef0d1.jpg Nothing Safe

Alice in Chains

Nothing Safe

Rolling Stone: star rating
Community: star rating
5 3.5 0
September 2, 1999

This fall, it's box-set time for the very unsummery Seattle band Alice in Chains. Until then, there's this anthology, full of high points from their striking previous albums, plus a stray soundtrack appearance and a pair of live performances. The set opens with two previously unreleased songs: "Get Born Again," recorded last year, is a drone lifted by ominous chorales, hardened by slashing guitars and set off with Layne Staley intoning, "Just repeat a couple lines"; "We Die Young" is a fiery demo. You wouldn't call Alice in Chains a wide-ranging band — they've never met a minor key they didn't love, and melody, in their view, exists to be kept on a leash. But they excel at misery and suffering because they're so disciplined and because they exercise such consistent taste in communicating their blues-grunge-hard-rock despair. "Would?," from 1992's Dirt, is a Seattle song that in 1999 evokes no grunge nostalgia. It's timeless, one of the most stylish singles of the decade, the work of a band which understands that life gets way out of hand but that first-rate rock recordings can't.

prev
Album Review Main Next

ADD A COMMENT

Community Guidelines »
loading comments

loading comments...

COMMENTS

Sort by:
    Read More
    Daily Newsletter

    Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

    Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
    marketing partners.

    X

    We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

    Song Stories

    “Promiscuous”

    Nelly Furtado with Timbaland | 2006

    This club-oriented single featuring Timbaland, who produced Nelly Furtado's third album, Loose, was Furtado’s sexy return after the Canadian singer's exploration of her Portuguese heritage on Folklore. "In the studio, initially I didn’t know if I could do it, 'cause Timbaland wrote that chorus," Furtado said. "I'm like, 'That's cool, but I don't know if I'm ready to do full-out club.'" The flirty lyrics are a dance between a guy and girl, each knowing they will end up in bed together but still playing the game. "Tim and I called it 'The BlackBerry Song,' she said, "because everything we say in the song you could text-message to somebody."

    More Song Stories entries »
    www.expandtheroom.com