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http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/lucinda-1389202605.jpg Lucinda Williams

Lucinda Williams

Lucinda Williams

Lucinda Williams Music/Thirty Tigers
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January 14, 2014

It's fitting that Lucinda Williams' 1988 LP was initially released by England's Rough Trade, home to the Smiths and the Raincoats – it deserves as much credit as any album for spearheading the so-called Americana movement, country's post-punk equivalent. Finally back in print, every song burns hot as ever: the indie jangle-twang of "Passionate Kisses" (which won a Country Song of the Year Grammy via Mary Chapin Carpenter's inferior version), the incandescent sexiness of "Like a Rose," and "The Night's Too Long," which could nearly be an outtake from Bruce Springsteen's Nebraska. The live bonus disc features non-LP tracks (including an early version of "Something About What Happens When We Talk"), a crack band with guitarist Gurf Morlix and a riveting singer, fully formed.

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