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http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/a861cfb057bb7f587551a13048a20f5ffeb231d2.jpg Live at the Royal Albert Hall

The Who

Live at the Royal Albert Hall

Steamhammer/SPV
Rolling Stone: star rating
Community: star rating
5 3 0
July 15, 2003

A few years back, The Who — guitarist Pete Townshend, singer Roger Daltrey and bassist John Entwistle — hit the road accompanied only by drummer Zak Starkey and keyboardist Rabbit Bundrick. The results were some of the most propulsive shows in the band's history — and that's saying something. This two-disc set, recorded in November 2000, captures that lineup in all its ragged glory. The band's progeny also pays due respect: Paul Weller joins Townshend for a moving acoustic duet on "So Sad About Us," and Eddie Vedder's joy at singing with his idols is palpable on "Let's See Action" and "I'm One." Entwistle died last year, of course, and this set includes a four-song bonus disc from his final gig with the group. Suffice to say that on "Summertime Blues" and "I Don't Even Know Myself," the Ox, like his mighty band, can be heard roaring still.

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