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http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/4d3ead8b41ddb443dcb26dba11f1bbdc9c59295a.jpg Live at the Fillmore 1969

The Move

Live at the Fillmore 1969

Right Recordings
Rolling Stone: star rating
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5 4 0
February 21, 2012

This is exciting rock archaeology: two CDs of the best British band most Yanks never heard in the Sixties, caught at a heavy-psychedelia peak on its only U.S. tour. The Move were almost too cool for America, a U.K.-hit-single machine of mod-squad assault, acid-pop eccentricity and, in singer Carl Wayne, white-soul force. These October '69 shows combine guitarist-composer Roy Wood's ingenious takes on madness – "I Can Hear the Grass Grow," "Cherry Blossom Clinic (Revisited)" – with explosive Nazz, Byrds and Tom Paxton covers that will make you wish you'd been there and glad that tape was running.

Listen to "Cherry Blossom Clinic (Revisited)":

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