.
http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/3bf6fe50a71055d98a90e50984297dbef5631dcb.jpg Let It Be

The Replacements

Let It Be

Restless
Rolling Stone: star rating
Community: star rating
5 5 0
July 28, 2005

The Replacements' Let It Be is one of the most lovable albums ever to come out of the American garage: a shabbily tuneful bash-and-pop masterpiece about youthful uncertainty, androgyny and getting your tonsils out, complete with a Kiss cover and a Ted Nugent-indebted barnburner called "Gary's Got a Boner."

Released in 1984, Let It Be was one of the high points of the get-in-the-van Eighties indie-rock scene, but these well-soused Minnesotans had no use for the principles or oblique artiness of contemporary bands such as Sonic Youth or Husker Du. Instead, frontman Paul Westerberg crammed the equivalent of a half-dozen John Hughes films into thirty-three brilliant minutes, claiming Springsteenian passion and regular-dude earnestness for overgrown kids trapped in the Midwest.

Let It Be brilliantly mixes up recklessness and vulnerability: The opening one-two punch of "I Will Dare" and "Favorite Thing" have just the right amounts of smartass sneering and undeniable melody. But the real surprise is a series of bighearted ballads — the everything-sucks lament "Sixteen Blue," the gorgeous, trend-monitoring "Androgynous" and "Unsatisfied," a slice of adolescent agony that stands as the best song Westerberg has ever written. Few albums so brilliantly evoke the travails of growing up, and even fewer have so perfectly captured a young band in all its ragged glory.

prev
Album Review Main Next

ADD A COMMENT

Community Guidelines »
loading comments

loading comments...

COMMENTS

Sort by:
    Read More
    Daily Newsletter

    Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

    Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
    marketing partners.

    X

    We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

    Song Stories

    “Santa Monica”

    Everclear | 1996

    After his brother and girlfriend both died of drug overdoses, Art Alexakis -- depressed and hooked on drugs himself -- jumped off the Santa Monica Pier in California, determined to die. "It was really stupid," said the Everclear frontman, who would further explore his personal emotional journey in the song "Father of Mine." "I went under the water. Then I said, 'I don't wanna die.'" The song, declaring "Let's swim out past the breakers/and watch the world die," was intended as a manifesto for change, Alexakis said. "Let the world do what it's gonna do and just live on our own."

    More Song Stories entries »
    www.expandtheroom.com