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http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/88cf4491fde18abccf702153c22a26c4f915fdd3.jpg Kaputt

Destroyer

Kaputt

Merge
Rolling Stone: star rating
Community: star rating
5 3.5 0
January 25, 2011

Click to listen to "Kaputt" and "Chinatown"

Best known as the guy in the New Pornographers who sings the frizzed-out Bowie-esque songs, Dan Bejar has been making his own lovably pretentious glam-folk records as Destroyer for more than a decade. Bejar's ninth disc detours into all manner of early-Eighties smoothness — glassy New Wave bass lines, blue-Monday synths, turquoise- sport-coat saxophones, backup singers straight off a Steely Dan record, all filtered through the obtuse, literary bent that turns Destroyer albums into such fun puzzles. Bejar's lyrics are sad-poet spirals, glancing off politics, sex, drugs and music, and packed with perfect New Wave laments like "Magnolia's a girl/Her heart's made of wood/ As apocalypses go, that's pretty good."

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