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http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/f761aed55fcac15c818dd19d8e56ddd367ab2740.jpg iTunes Session (EP)

Vampire Weekend

iTunes Session (EP)

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Rolling Stone: star rating
Community: star rating
5 3 0
December 21, 2010

Vampire Weekend don't reinvent the six songs they run through on this live-in-the-studio session, but they do some nifty interior decorating. Trumpets add a Victorian air to VW's Afro-tinged hits "A-Punk" and "Cape Cod Kwassa Kwassa," and the band slows down the ska-tinged "Holiday," making it groove like a stoned Christmas party. On a loopy-yet-reverent cover of Bruce Springsteen's "I'm Going Down," Jersey native Ezra Koenig slips into the Bruce impression that lurks in every Garden State soul. But VW are more at home with "Have I the Right," by British Invasion one-hit wonders the Honeycombs, turning a fresh-faced stomp into a jazzy shamble. The affinity makes sense: The Honeycombs looked like actuaries and had one of rock's first girl drummers. They were a perfect rock & roll oddity, just like Vampire Weekend.

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