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http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/a5597f5a178d39950ad7374e6b144e5a5e84b4fc.jpg It Still Moves

My Morning Jacket

It Still Moves

RCA Records
Rolling Stone: star rating
Community: star rating
5 3 0
September 9, 2003

Inside the oceanic reverb that soaks every twang and sigh on It Still Moves, the third album by the Louisville, Kentucky, quintet My Morning Jacket, is a first-class acid-country Radiohead swimming slowly to the surface. The group's lack of hurry can be exasperating; some songs seem to take days to hit chorus pay dirt (the swollen-pain refrain in the Day-Glo crawl "Master Plan") and guitar-jam daylight (the midsection of "Run Thru"). But Jacket mastermind Jim James, the band's vocalist-songwriter-producer, knows the difference between wasting time and warping it, although he sings a lot about being fogged in by liquor and hopelessness. "I Will Sing You Songs" is a long bath of rolling-tide guitars, cymbal splashes and James' liquid-silver hallelujah — Fleetwood Mac's "Albatross" via Smile-era Brian Wilson. And there is a sharp, Southern-barbecue tang to the brass behind the '68-Fillmore-dream guitars in "Easy Morning Rebel." My Morning Jacket are going nowhere fast — but in all the right ways.

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