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http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/fb630fa49a474876ea1025ee4f396e87d801eba0.jpg In the Grace of Your Love

The Rapture

In the Grace of Your Love

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5 3.5 0
September 6, 2011

Click to listen to The Rapture's album 'In the Grace of Your Love'

On their first album in five years, these New York dance punkers stumble out of the House of Jealous Lovers and into the house of God. Frontman Luke Jenner dials his diva shriek down to a gospel-inflected croon he honed singing with a Brooklyn church choir, and Grace breaks pretty cleanly from the band's signature taut disco – see the free-jazz sax on "Sail Away," the trippy electrocumbia of "Come Back to Me," and the title track, where whooshing cymbals and atonal guitar brighten Jenner's exalted cries. It won't get you shaking your ass, but swaying eyesclosed on Sunday morning has its appeals too.

Related:
Rapture Frontman Luke Jenner on Quitting the Band, Learning to Be a Man and Embracing Positivity

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