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http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/teen-1348513426.jpeg In Limbo

Teen

In Limbo

Carpark
Rolling Stone: star rating
Community: star rating
5 3 0
September 25, 2012

Singer Teenie Lieberson, her two sisters and another pal convened last year in Brooklyn with one apparent mission: Imagine space rock as it might've sounded before the moon landing, in the time of girl groups and garage bands. Their first full-length grooves on the easy symmetry of unfussy harmonies and dead-simple, no-hurry guitar, drum, and keyboard parts well buttered with reverb. (Pete Kember, of the echo-happy Spacemen 3, produced.) Teenie, formerly of Here We Go Magic, lays the retro-innocence on a little heavy, ruminating over frenching "too many men." But between the matter-of-fact beauty of her sweetly somber voice and the album's unapologetically fat synths, even a track like "Huh," with its distinctly unpromising title, proves highly evocative.

Listen to 'In Limbo':

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