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http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/d25bfd6dfbeaf118a80bd18a2910e8687784244c.jpg Heroes Are Hard To Find

Fleetwood Mac

Heroes Are Hard To Find

Reprise
Rolling Stone: star rating
Community: star rating
5 0 0
October 24, 1974

After a brief identity crisis (another band usurping their identities), the real Fleetwood Mac is back on record. They've still got the same smooth soft-rock sound they've had for three years, since Jeremy Spencer found religion (or vice versa). The group's gone a little funkier in places, which turns out both annoying ("Born Enchanter," "Angel") and intriguing ("Heroes Are Hard To Find"). Their smoother numbers alternately mesmerize ("She's Changing Me") or narcotize ("Coming Home"). A major problem remains in Bob Welch's naggingly nasal vocals, although he's usually swathed in protective layers of lush harmonies.

Overall, though, Heroes Are Hard To Find stacks up as a very pleasant album, thanks chiefly to a pair of Christine McVie tracks. "Prove Your Love" is exquisitely pretty and "Come a Little Bit Closer" is a gorgeous tune reminiscent of the Beach Boys and especially of the Raspberries' brilliant "Overnight Sensation." Add the ominous "Bermuda Triangle" and an attractive "Bad Loser" and the end results are definitely worth investigating.

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