.
http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/f0b883837e58f993cad3845fa9f21863abace6cf.jpg Hello

Karmin

Hello

Epic
Rolling Stone: star rating
Community: star rating
5 1.5 0
26
May 8, 2012

Viral video-stars-turned-major-label recording artists Karmin (real-life couple Amy Heidemann and Nick Noonan) have a great back-story. They also have one of the most aggressively obnoxious debut albums in recent memory. The Boston duo burst to prominence with peppy-precious electro covers of Lil Wayne and Chris Brown; for Hello they teamed with heavy-hitting songwriter-producers like Stargate. But the shtick is the same, as the pair retain a self-conscious "goofiness" that suggests the whole thing is a joke. Some of it is catchy – "Brokenhearted" has an irrefutable hook – but Heidemann’s daffiness and horrendous rapping spoil the broth every time. Karmin can make you hate pop music.

Listen to Karmin's 'Hello':

Related
Who is Karmin? From YouTube Stardom to 'Saturday Night Live'

26
prev
Album Review Main Next

ADD A COMMENT

Community Guidelines »
loading comments

loading comments...

COMMENTS

Sort by:
    Read More
    Daily Newsletter

    Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

    Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
    marketing partners.

    X

    We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

    Song Stories

    “Santa Monica”

    Everclear | 1996

    After his brother and girlfriend both died of drug overdoses, Art Alexakis -- depressed and hooked on drugs himself -- jumped off the Santa Monica Pier in California, determined to die. "It was really stupid," said the Everclear frontman, who would further explore his personal emotional journey in the song "Father of Mine." "I went under the water. Then I said, 'I don't wanna die.'" The song, declaring "Let's swim out past the breakers/and watch the world die," was intended as a manifesto for change, Alexakis said. "Let the world do what it's gonna do and just live on our own."

    More Song Stories entries »
    www.expandtheroom.com