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http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/bb8a9d41f17bcd3bcd2d8af8927bfbaa02562701.jpg Ha Ha I’m Sorry EP

Kitty Pryde

Ha Ha I’m Sorry EP

self-released
Rolling Stone: star rating
Community: star rating
5 3.5 0
June 25, 2012

"Rap game Taylor Swift" crows teenage internet sensation Kitty Pryde, and she's not far off: like Swift, the Daytona Beach, Florida rapper is a whip-smart young woman from the suburbs with a gift for pouring her loves and loathings into sharp, catchy songs. Of course, Kitty Pryde is a lot hipper, and a lot less PG, than Swift. On her new EP she rhymes – wittily and deftly but with an appealing casualness – about drunk-dialing and coke-snorting; she repurposes Carly Rae Jepsen ("GIVE ME SCABIES"); she shouts out Frank Ocean and fashion designer Betsey Johnson; she even winks at the Lana Del Ray kerfuffle ("You hide out in the cubicle and ponder whose daughter I am"). She boasts that she’s "ruining hip-hop." Maybe she is – for the better.

Listen to "Ay Shawty":

Related
Kitty Pryde Makes Live NYC Debut

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