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http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/cd62729847d6c66f388d65dab815354c7e4457e8.jpg From Memphis to Hollywood: Bootleg Vol. 2

Johnny Cash

From Memphis to Hollywood: Bootleg Vol. 2

Columbia/Legacy
Rolling Stone: star rating
Community: star rating
5 4.5 0
February 22, 2011

Click to listen to Johnny Cash's "Get Rhythm"

Even as a young turk, Johnny Cash sang with the voice of experience. The first disc of this fantastic two-CD set (which features 26 cuts previously unreleased in the U.S.) gives us the sound of Cash in his twenties – demos and radio appearances from the 1950s. Cash's singing is higher and sprier than in his prime, but the gravitas is there. (Check out the demo of a little ditty called "I Walk the Line.") Disc Two turns to outtakes and rarities from the 1960s. There are jailhouse weepers, lullabies and gallows humor like "Five Minutes to Live" – a jaw-dropping testament to the depth of the man's songbook.

Photos: Intimate, All-Access Shots of Johnny Cash

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