.
http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/2884fcc4c8018244ad730b35e152e2ba9606b17c.jpg Festival

Santana

Festival

Rolling Stone: star rating
Community: star rating
5 0 0
March 11, 1981

With Amigos, his last LP, Carlos Santana began rebuilding his status as a pop musician, a status he lost with the admirable — but spotty and often inaccessible — Caravanserai; Love, Devotion and Surrender; and Borboletta. Yet on Festivál he may have embraced the mainstream a mite too much. Though this record is far stronger on the whole than Amigos, it lacks that album's memorable chordal quirks and peaks of intensity, sometimes sounding like a prisoner of its own commercial aspirations. Festivál's up cuts, like "Mariá Caracóles," "Let the Music Set You Free," "Reach Up," "Let the Children Play" and "Jugando," all set rich enough grooves, but are flat compared to Amigos' moments of brilliance. In fact, Santana doesn't do much work here at all, noticeably subordinating himself to his surroundings (for example, "Give Me Love," which is virtually sans Carlos, sounds — literally and completely — like an Earth, Wind and Fire track). I like Festivál, but I would have liked more — a more I figure Carlos Santana can now dispense almost at will — better.

prev
Album Review Main Next

ADD A COMMENT

Community Guidelines »
loading comments

loading comments...

COMMENTS

Sort by:
    Read More
    Around the Web
    Powered By ZergNet
    Daily Newsletter

    Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

    Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
    marketing partners.

    X

    We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

    Song Stories

    “San Francisco Mabel Joy”

    Mickey Newbury | 1969

    A country-folk song of epic proportions, "San Francisco Mabel Joy" tells the tale of a poor Georgia farmboy who wound up in prison after a move to the Bay Area found love turning into tragedy. First released by Mickey Newbury in 1969, it might be more familiar through covers by Waylon Jennings, Joan Baez and Kenny Rogers. "It was a five-minute song written in a two-minute world," Newbury said. "I was told it would never be cut by any artist ... I was told you could not use the term 'redneck' in a song and get it recorded."

    More Song Stories entries »
    www.expandtheroom.com