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http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/72ac8d7059ab2383cc040f81b46f90b5ad23c09b.jpg Feeling the Space

Yoko Ono

Feeling the Space

Rolling Stone: star rating
Community: star rating
5 0 0
November 8, 1973

Not bad, at all. Backed by some of the best musicians in the business, among them David Spinozza, Jim Keltner, Sneaky Pete and Jeremy Steig, Yoko's latest is her most accessible. At the core of her artistry is the aesthetics of childlike wonder, a radically assumed innocence that demands either emotional participation or rejection, leaving no in-between ground. Feeling In Space comprises 12 sung poems, many of them head-on expressions of Yoko's passionately feminist humanism. The three best cuts are "Growing Pain," a plaintive ballad with a sweet melody and blunt, striking images; "Woman Power," an elemental rocker, and the narrative "Angry Young Woman." Though Yoko's singing continues to improve, her writing is still much better than her vocals, also, on occasion she shows a welcome and refreshing sense of humor.

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