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http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/df883f508d9741fd4643dbe9132e40a54abb16cf.jpg Eclipse

Journey

Eclipse

Nomata LLC
Rolling Stone: star rating
Community: star rating
5 2 0
24
June 7, 2011

It takes 17 minutes and 39 seconds to hit the first satisfyingly Journey-sounding moment on Eclipse, the band's 14th album: a soaring six-minute-plus power ballad, "Tantra." For a legacy act whose biggest new audience is "Don't Stop Believin' "-loving Glee fans, that's about 17 minutes too long. Journey's second disc with Filipino YouTube discovery Arnel Pineda on vocals is both grand and distractingly proggy. Pineda hits heart-stopping high notes, but guitarist Neal Schon OD's on noodly solos and chugging Nineties-style power chords. Bloat is a problem (check the Buddhist monk chants on "Resonate"), though nothing can stop "Someone," a love anthem where hard-charging guitars shove schmaltz aside.

Listen to "Tantra":

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