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http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/e55c1dd066b2bb53ff35756a3b424d60fefe1e83.jpg Don't Believe The Truth

Oasis

Don't Believe The Truth

Rolling Stone: star rating
Community: star rating
5 3.5 0
June 2, 2005

Watching Oasis' precipitous decline from Brit-pop superstardom has sort of been like watching the Yankees blow it last October: You knew they had it coming, but it was still kind of sad to see. Don't Believe the Truth, their seventh album, isn't the comeback fans have long been praying for, but it's the first Oasis album in years that doesn't sound like pale self-imitation. The bigger presence of guitarist Gem Archer as well as an increased emphasis on texture — including plenty of subdued psych-rock atmosphere — rescue confidently rockin' winners such as "The Meaning of Soul" from the kind of dunderheaded grand gestures Oasis had gotten increasingly worse at writing, and tracks like "The Importance of Being Idle" channel laid-back Sixties-pop cool. So: Now that they've fought off complacency and cocaine, can we get that Behind the Music episode?

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