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http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/512074d826ac7c3123d139816072dccad5bf27b4.jpg Divine Providence

Deer Tick

Divine Providence

Partisan
Rolling Stone: star rating
Community: star rating
5 3.5 0
October 25, 2011

Click to listen to Deer Tick's 'Main Street'

If Deer Tick's first couple of albums got the Rhode Island band branded as an alt-country act, their latest is a drunk leaning into your face and yelling, "You don't know me, man!" On a set of howling rockers, frontman John McCauley pulls a genre jailbreak as impressive as the time that Ryan Adams ditched Whiskeytown to pledge his love for Morrissey and electric Dylan. Gang-holler choruses recall guitarist Ian O'Neil's last band, Titus Andronicus; "Main Street" nods to a classic Rolling Stones album. But the unlisted cover of Paul Westerberg's "Mr. Cigarette" suggests the set's true patron saint: a punk-rock singer- songwriter who does as he damn well pleases.

Related
Deer Tick Rock to Raise Awareness for 'Occupy Wall Street'
Deer Tick Perform 'Main Street' on 'Letterman'

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