.
http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/3a1ae4b8c2dc75e3db9cab1ea23a04536ddd860e.jpg Court The Storm

Y La Bamba

Court The Storm

Tender Loving Empire
Rolling Stone: star rating
Community: star rating
5 3.5 0
March 22, 2012

It figures that matter-of-fact polyglots like Y La Bamba would vibe with producer Steve Berlin of matter-of-fact polyglots Los Lobos, who warms up Bamba's folk-rocking second record. Frontwoman Luz Elena Mendoza can warble tremulously like a Latina Joanna Newsomthen let rip a robust alt-country holler not unlike that of Neko Case, who joins the band on the title track. Mendoza crafts massed harmonies with co-writer Paul Cameron on "Moral Panic." On "Michoacan," a brisk mariachi-scented party jam, she sings of "dias de la cocaina," "dinero," and "la iglesia catolica." It's an American vision any gringo will recognize. 

Listen To Y La Bamba's "Court The Storm":

Related
Photos: Random Notes

prev
Album Review Main Next

ADD A COMMENT

Community Guidelines »
loading comments

loading comments...

COMMENTS

Sort by:
    Read More
    Around the Web
    Powered By ZergNet
    Daily Newsletter

    Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

    Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
    marketing partners.

    X

    We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

    Song Stories

    “Hungry Like the Wolf”

    Duran Duran | 1982

    This indulgent New Romantic group generated their first U.S. hit with the help of what was at the time new technology. "Simon [Le Bon] and I, I think, had been out the night before and had this terrible hangover," said keyboardist Nick Rhodes. "For some reason we were feeling guilty about it and decided to go and do some work." Rhodes started playing with his Jupiter-8 synth, and then "Simon had an idea for a lyric, and by lunchtime when everyone else turned up, we pretty much had the song." The Simmons drumbeat was equally important to the sound of "Hungry Like the Wolf," as Duran Duran drummer Roger Taylor stated it "kind of defined the drum sound for the Eighties."

    More Song Stories entries »
    www.expandtheroom.com