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http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/55529dc8eef2c32a9422d346670f5cc92b071b55.jpg Chickenfoot III

Chickenfoot

Chickenfoot III

eOne Music
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14
September 27, 2011

Click to listen to Chickenfoot's 'Three and a Half Letters'

Sammy Hagar, Joe Satriani, Michael Anthony and Chad Smith have no problem finding a groove on Chickenfoot III, the confusingly titled second album by their Cabo Wabo hobby-turned-globe-trotting-alliance. They remember when hard rock meant funky stuff with misogynistic machismo on top - see brontosaurus burgers like "Alright, Alright." But the band plods more than pushes, and while the riffs stick, the songs generally don't. The unemployment report "Three and a Half Letters" and the gas-guzzling road-burner "Big Foot" get by, though: It's hard to hate big-boned butt rock from guys clearly making it because they still love the form.

Related
Inside Chickenfoot's 'Life-Changing' Second Album

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