.
http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/robin-thicke-blurred-lines-album-cover-1373911639.jpg Blurred Lines

Robin Thicke

Blurred Lines

Star Trak/Interscope
Rolling Stone: star rating
Community: star rating
5 3.5 0
14
July 30, 2013

Robin Thicke sings, writes, produces, plays keyboards and even raps a little on his excellent sixth album, but his greatest talent is projecting bonhomie. Thicke is the handsome son of a TV star, but he never incites resentment, because he always seems to be an amiable Joe who's in on the joke of stardom – the George Clooney of the club jam. In an era when Chris Brown remains a sex symbol for many people, his ability to be casual and gentlemanly while also boasting about the size of his rhymes-with-Thicke is nearly a miracle.

 To sharpen his attack, Thicke brings in an infantry of ride-or-die hitmakers: Will.i.am, Timbaland, Dr. Luke and, on the lewd worldwide smash "Blurred Lines," Pharrell. Each contributes a track, but Thicke never loses control; the album is unified by his relaxed croon and warm merrymaking, which ranges from 1970s Miami funk ("Ain't No Hat 4 That") to cheeky impersonations of dubstep ("Give It 2 U"). There's only one dud, the happy-anniversary ballad "4 the Rest of My Life," which is also the album's most personal song. Thicke dulled previous LPs with expressions of angst – here, he makes a near-perfect summer record by acting like his life is as perfect as his hair. Maybe his package really is as big as he claims.

14
prev
Album Review Main Next

ADD A COMMENT

Community Guidelines »
loading comments

loading comments...

COMMENTS

Sort by:
    Read More
    Daily Newsletter

    Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

    Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
    marketing partners.

    X

    We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

    Song Stories

    “American Girl”

    Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers | 1976

    It turns out that a single with "American" in its title--recorded on the Fourth of July during the nation's Bicentennial, no less--can actually sell better in Britain. Coupled with the Heartbreakers' flair for Byrds jangle and Animals hooks, though, is Tom Petty's native-Florida drawl that keeps this classic grounded at home. Petty dispelled rumors that the song was about a suicidal student, explaining that the inspiration came from when he was 25 and used to salute the highway traffic outside his apartment window. "It sounded like the ocean to me," he recalled. "That was my ocean. My Malibu. Where I heard the waves crash, but it was just the cars going by."

    More Song Stories entries »
    www.expandtheroom.com