.
http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/e41bfd4192865416b81ec402385c10b07713962a.jpg Black Holes And Revelations

Muse

Black Holes And Revelations

Rolling Stone: star rating
Community: star rating
5 3.5 0
July 24, 2006

Muse's fourth album is one of the year's most overblown records, mixing together huge, doomy soundscapes, snarling guitars and space-age sound effects with Matthew Bellamy's operatic wail and lyrics about stuff like death, injustice and "superstars sucked into the supermassive." This isn't so surprising coming from these sub-Radiohead gloomsters; what's surprising is that most of the time, Black Holes and Revelations actually works. There's room for melody on seductive songs like "Invincible," an epic with military drums and laser-beam guitar. Sleek, falsetto-laden lead single "Supermassive Black Hole" bangs like prime Depeche Mode, and "Starlight" sets sparkling patter and Coldplay-style swoons over an almost power-pop groove. A couple of sci-fi anthems "Knights of Cydonia" and "City of Delusion" are as ridiculous as their track names. But if you manage to suspend your disbelief a little, Black Holes and Revelations will push your pleasure buttons.

prev
Album Review Main Next

ADD A COMMENT

Community Guidelines »
loading comments

loading comments...

COMMENTS

Sort by:
    Read More
    Around the Web
    Powered By ZergNet
    Daily Newsletter

    Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

    Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
    marketing partners.

    X

    We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

    Song Stories

    “San Francisco Mabel Joy”

    Mickey Newbury | 1969

    A country-folk song of epic proportions, "San Francisco Mabel Joy" tells the tale of a poor Georgia farmboy who wound up in prison after a move to the Bay Area found love turning into tragedy. First released by Mickey Newbury in 1969, it might be more familiar through covers by Waylon Jennings, Joan Baez and Kenny Rogers. "It was a five-minute song written in a two-minute world," Newbury said. "I was told it would never be cut by any artist ... I was told you could not use the term 'redneck' in a song and get it recorded."

    More Song Stories entries »
    www.expandtheroom.com