.
http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/f2728ea3961057d80f2caeafb6d02639d2d4e990.jpg Billy Idol

Billy Idol

Billy Idol

Rolling Stone: star rating
Community: star rating
5 4 0
September 2, 1982

Billy Idol's music has gone through many alterations since his days with Generation X. Back then, it was punk rock with a pop flair. Then, on his solo EP, Don't Stop, it was boring dance rock. Now, on his first album as a solo artist, Idol has moved into mainstream power rock. The LP is full of energetic, straight-ahead rock & roll, and it looks like Idol may have finally found a comfortable niche.

Idol has a gritty, aggressive voice — suggesting a hybrid of Bruce Springsteen, Lou Reed and Dave Clark. He's backed by a first-rate band of New York musicians who give his songs musical depth while keeping up a relentless pace. Admittedly, there's a disturbing familiarity about too many of the tunes here. Still, "Come On, Come On," "Hot in the City," "Love Calling" and "Shooting Stars" are powerful and catchy, and Billy Idol's combination of rock & roll energy and pop melodies makes this a very satisfying album.

prev
Album Review Main Next

ADD A COMMENT

Community Guidelines »
loading comments

loading comments...

COMMENTS

Sort by:
    Read More
    Around the Web
    Powered By ZergNet
    Daily Newsletter

    Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

    Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
    marketing partners.

    X

    We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

    Song Stories

    “Vans”

    The Pack | 2006

    Berkeley, California rappers the Pack made their footwear choice clear in 2006 with the song "Vans." The track caught the attention of Too $hort, who signed them to his imprint. MTV refused to play the video for the song, though, claiming it was essentially a commercial for the product. Rapper Lil' B disagreed. "I didn’t know nobody [at] Vans," he said. "I was just a rapper who wore Vans." Even without MTV's support, Lil' B recognized the impact of the track. "God blessed me with such a revolutionary song… People around my age know who really started a lot of the dressing people are into now."

    More Song Stories entries »
    www.expandtheroom.com