.
http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/5e2553d88431a643a4449b3e3b3bcc8bb6abf720.jpg Attack on Memory

Cloud Nothings

Attack on Memory

Carpark
Rolling Stone: star rating
Community: star rating
5 3.5 0
12
January 18, 2012

"Essential/It'll never get old," sings Cloud Nothings' Dylan Baldi. That's the Nineties- nostalgic gospel of this Cleveland band's second record; it’s not a new idea (cf. Yuck, Mr. Dream), but these guys might have the Clinton-era moves down better than anyone. On the murderously slow "No Future/No Past," The Bends and In Utero make out on a crusty futon, while songs like "Fall In" and the eight-minute "Wasted Days" imagine Green Day if they were thick-necked Midwestern noise heathens. Producer Steve Albini makes sure you feel every snare slap and guitar abrasion, and if Attack on Memory's eight songs only last about as long as an episode of Seinfeld, that's OK – it's as fun as one too.

Listen to "Fall In":

Related
Free Download: Cloud Nothings' Lo-Fi Track 'Stay Useless'

12
prev
Album Review Main Next

ADD A COMMENT

Community Guidelines »
loading comments

loading comments...

COMMENTS

Sort by:
    Read More
    Around the Web
    Powered By ZergNet
    Daily Newsletter

    Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

    Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
    marketing partners.

    X

    We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

    Song Stories

    “You Oughta Know”

    Alanis Morissette | 1995

    This blunt, bitter breakup song -- famous for its line "Would she go down on you in a theater?" -- was long rumored to be about Alanis Morissette getting dumped by Full House actor Dave Coulier. But while she never confirmed it was about him (Coulier himself says it is, however), she insisted the song wasn't all about scorn. "By no means is this record just a sexual, angry record," she told Rolling Stone. "The song wasn't written for the sake of revenge. It was written for the sake of release. I'm actually a pretty rational, calm person."

    More Song Stories entries »
    www.expandtheroom.com