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http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/1b58d47915944a8df675687ee71f4e96cbc026bb.jpg Ancient & Modern 1911-2011

Mekons

Ancient & Modern 1911-2011

Sin/Bloodshot
Rolling Stone: star rating
Community: star rating
5 3.5 0
September 27, 2011

Click to listen to Mekons' 'Geeshie'

Barely famous after 30 years of damning the marketplace, Mekons fear no genre. They all but invented country punk in the mid-Eighties, but dabbled in everything from indie-rock thunder to baffling electronic albums. Ancient & Modern, their first in four years, is meaty and grizzled folk rock. Sally Timms’ near-whisper strides through the cabaret-jazzy "Geeshie"; Tom Greenhalgh's pipes anchor melancholy strummers; and semi-leader Jon Langford leaps around the stage ("Space in Your Face"). The title track is almost a play on nostalgia's seductive power, complete with violin and singalong verses about sailing away. After all these years, you still want to join them. 

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