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http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/27aac864e72c5b52653a7f8954128c876a48ffab.png Amanda Leigh

Mandy Moore

Amanda Leigh

Rolling Stone: star rating
Community: star rating
5 3.5 0
May 26, 2009

The title is taken from the singer's real first and middle names, the acoustic instrumentation emits a cozy campfire glow, and the album was recorded in a modest basement home studio. Message: This is real music, not computerized starlet pop. Listeners are advised to ignore the authenticity issues and focus on Moore's catchy tunes and warm voice on Amanda Leigh. Co-writing with producer Mike Viola, she swings from folk-rock confessions ("Merrimack River") to perky pop ("Nothing Everything"), delivering 11 shapely songs that would sound good even if they were recorded in a penthouse.

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