Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert Battle for 'Star Wars' Supremacy

The two comedy pals use lightsabers, the Force in a promo video for charity campaign

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Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert have always been neck-and-neck in the battle for Comedy Central late-night supremacy, but they now have another, more personal, score to settle: Who's the biggest Star Wars fan? The two hosts joined Forces for a spectacularly silly promotional clip for Disney and LucasFilm's ongoing UNICEF campaign on Omaze, which will send one lucky Star Wars fan and a guest to the film's London set, where they'll appear in a scene, get behind-the-scenes access to a closed shoot and meet a variety of cast members.

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The clip opens with a flummoxed Colbert calling Stewart to share news of the charitable giveaway. But instead of geeking out about their odds at Star Wars glory, they immediately begin arguing over who knows more nerdy franchise trivia. (When Stewart says he "takes umbrage" at the idea of Colbert being the bigger fan, the latter comedian asks for his umbrage back.) Instead of Colbert's proposed knife fight, they settle on a trivia contest, but Stewart uses a sneak-attack, wielding a red Darth Vader lightsaber while dressed as Obi-Wan Kenobi. (His blue lightsaber didn't have fresh batteries.) It isn't worth spoiling the grand finale, but let's just say there's a Princess Leia costume involved. 

Whoever wins the charity contest – and that person will likely not be Stewart or Colbert – is one lucky nerd. One $10 donation is all it takes to enter, but time is in short supply: The campaign runs until 11:59 p.m. PST on Friday, July 18th.

Episode VII director J.J. Abrams announced the Force for Change project in a May video filmed at the Abu Dhabi set of the upcoming sequel. Disney has already committed $1 million to the project, which, according to a press release, will raise funds and awareness for UNICEF's Innovation Labs "and its innovative programs that are benefiting the world's most vulnerable children."

Some of those programs include building "portable, solar-powered learning kits being built in China, Uganda, and Burundi to ensure underprivileged children in these countries have access to relevant, high-quality educational materials" and "mobile phone application developed in South Sudan and Uganda, and used in the Philippines, that helps reunite children with their families after an emergency."

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