Bryan Cranston Hints at Walter White's Return

The actor discussed his 'Breaking Bad' character this week on CNN

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"Felina," the acclaimed series finale of Breaking Bad, ended the AMC drama in the most fitting way possible (SPOILER ALERT): with meth-mastermind Walter White (Bryan Cranston) in his final moments – eyes wide, clinging to "his precious" lab equipment, drifting into death from a machine gun bullet wound after facing down a gang of Nazis. But is that what really happened? Really? 

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On Thursday, Cranston sat down for a quick chat with CNN's Ashleigh Banfield – and while the Godzilla star focused on promoting his new blockbuster, their conversation quickly turned to Walter White, with Banfield astutely observing that the character never closes his eyes during that so-called "death scene." 

"I wasn't so sure that you died," she tells the Emmy-winner. "Your eyes were still open." Her theory is that White gets taken into police custody, breaks out of prison and "goes nuts." Cranston, wearing that ever-charming, devil-may-care grin, notes that viewers "never saw a bag zip up or anything" and says he doesn't know whether or not the character has entered the Great Meth Lab in the Sky. "Never say never," he continues, when Banfield asks about the possibility of seeing the character again.

Of course, the actor – who recently penned an upcoming memoir – also makes a joke seconds earlier about how White had a sex change in his dying moments, so it's a good idea to digest this tidbit with a major grain of meth-salt. 

The most logical project to revisit Cranston's iconic character is the upcoming Breaking Bad spinoff, Better Call Saul, which focuses on the exploits of seedy criminal lawyer Saul Goodman. Aaron Paul, who played Jesse Pinkman on the original series, was in "serious talks" earlier this year to star in the prequel series, telling Details in January, "Both Bryan [Cranston] and I want to be a part of that, if they'll have us."

The whole CNN interview is worth exploring. Elsewhere, Cranston talks about his strategic career choices, his original X-Files connection with Breaking Bad creator Vince Gilligan and how he "look(s) like the guy in the hemorrhoid commercial."