.

movie reviews

The Commitments

Robert Arkins, Michael Aherne, Angeline Ball

Directed by: Alan Parker

How to film Roddy Doyle's comic and affecting novel about a Dublin band trying to bring soul music to Ireland? Audition 3000 musicians and pick the top twelve to play the Commitments. It's the old Monkees trick: If you can't find a band, manufacture one. British director Alan Parker (Fame, Mississippi Burning) lucks out. The dozen unknowns he's chosen – ten with no previous acting credits – make a joyful noise and rousing company. Parker, however, hasn't m... | More »

August 2, 1991

Doc Hollywood

Michael J. Fox, Julie Warner, Barnard Hughes

Directed by: Michael Caton-Jones

In a pleasurably low-key comedy that pits small-town values against big-city excess, director Michael Caton-Jones (Scandal, Memphis Belle) struggles to evoke the vintage corn of Frank Capra. Michael J. Fox stars as Ben Stone, a doc driving cross-country to begin work as a $600,000-a-year plastic surgeon. But when he crashes into a judge's fence in Grady, South Carolina, Stone is sentenced to perform a few days of free clinic service in this "Hee Haw from hell." Can our hero find happine... | More »

July 26, 1991

V.I. Warshawski

Kathleen Turner, Jay O. Sanders, Charles Durning

Directed by: Jeff Kanew

Disney's hollywood pictures has given a shoddy once-over to Sara Paretsky's classy novels about a female dick from Chicago named V.I. Warshawski. The film looks as if it were shot through ripped pantyhose. It took three writers to craft a script of unvarying clichés. And the direction, by Jeff Kanew, is all you'd expect from the hack who brought forth Revenge of the Nerds and Troop Beverly Hills. What juice remains is due to Kathleen Turner's sass as Victoria Iphig... | More »

Trust

Adrienne Shelly, Martin Donovan, Merritt Nelson

Directed by: Hal Hartley

In his auspicious debut feature,The Unbelievable Truth, writer-director Hal Hartley fashioned a quirky romance between an ambitious model and a suspected mass murderer who were products of neurotic middle-class families on Long Island. Hartley, who was born and raised in that New York suburban region, returns to the same fertile ground in Trust and confirms his promise as a gifted comic mannerist. The lovers in Trust flaunt their emotional wounds. Maria, played by Truth's ultrasexy Adrie... | More »

The Dark Backward

Judd Nelson, Bill Paxton

Directed by: Adam Rifkin

How often do you see Judd Nelson, Rob Lowe, James Caan, Wayne Newton and Lara Flynn Boyle in the same film? Never again, if fate is kind. Director Adam Rifkin wrote the script for this comedy six years ago when he was nineteen. The result would be more excusable if he had written it nineteen years ago when he was six. The plot concerns Marty Malt (Nelson), a nerdy garbageman who moonlights as a stand-up comic. Nobody laugha at Marty's jokes, except his buddy Gus (Bill Paxton), but then ... | More »

Trust

Adrienne Shelly, Martin Donovan, Edie Falco

Directed by: Hal Hartley

In his auspicious debut feature, The Unbelievable Truth, writer-director Hal Hartley fashioned a quirky romance between an ambitious model and a suspected mass murderer who were products of neurotic middle-class families on Long Island. Hartley, who was born and raised in that New York suburban region, returns to the same fertile ground in Trust and confirms his promise as a gifted comic mannerist. The lovers in Trust flaunt their emotional wounds. Maria, played by Truth's ultrasexy Adri... | More »

V.I. Warshawski

Kathleen Turner

Directed by: Jeff Kanew

Disney's Hollywood pictures has given a shoddy once-over to Sara Paretsky's classy novels about a female dick from Chicago named V.I. Warshawski. The film looks as if it were shot through ripped pantyhose. It took three writers to craft a script of unvarying cliches. And the direction, by Jeff Kanew, is all you'd expect from the hack who brought forth Revenge of the Nerds and Troop Beverly Hills. That juice remains is due to Kathleen Turner's sass as Victoria Iphigenia (s... | More »

July 24, 1991

The Doctor

William Hurt, Christine Lahti, Elizabeth Perkins

Directed by: Randa Haines

Despite the congratulatory reviews, this movie is an even more depressing specimen of the feel-good boom than Regarding Henry. The Doctor – based on a gritty nonfiction book by Ed Rosenbaum, M.D. – trivializes an intriguing premise: What happens when the doctor becomes the patient? Jack MacKee, played by William Hurt, is a smugly prosperous San Francisco surgeon so detached about his work that he sings while sewing up his patients. Then MacKee finds he has throat cancer. Looking t... | More »

July 12, 1991

Point Break

Patrick Swayze, Keanu Reeves

Directed by: Kathryn Bigelow

Keanu Reeves plays Johnny Utah, an FBI rookie sent undercover to infiltrate a band of L.A. surfers who stick up banks while wearing rubber masks of Reagan, Nixon, Carter and Johnson. Utah is determined to bring down these ex-presidents; he's that kind of dude. Bureau old-timers think Utah is "young, dumb and full of cum," a big dis applicable to many of the characters in W. Peter Iliff's airheaded script. Reeves proves a resourceful actor, though, especially in his scenes with Gary... | More »

July 10, 1991

Regarding Henry

Annette Bening

Directed by: Mike Nichols

Given the reputations of star Harrison Ford and director Mike Nichols, one expects more from their first collaboration since Working Girl than this slick tearjerker. The script, by twenty-four-year-old Jeffrey Abrams (Taking Care of Business), has a knack for trivializing the big issues it strenuously raises. Ford plays Henry Turner, a Manhattan attorney with a lavish apartment that represents his status as a legal shark. Henry is your basic shit, not above fudging the truth in order to crush... | More »

Movie Reviews

More Reviews »
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

www.expandtheroom.com