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Welcome to the Rileys

Kristen Stewart, James Gandolfini, Melissa Leo

Directed by Jake Scott
Rolling Stone: star rating
5 2
Community: star rating
5 2 0
October 28, 2010

Would you believe Kristen Stewart as an underage New Orleans stripper who hooks on the side? Or James Gandolfini as a married Indiana plumbing salesman who'd rather adopt her than screw her? Then Welcome to the Rileys may reach you in ways it never reached me.

Stewart, out of her Twilight zone, is less mannered than usual. And Gandolfini commits fully to the gentle side of a man who sees his dead daughter reborn in KStew's lap dancer. Melissa Leo also scores as his agoraphobic wife. But the actors and admirably sensitive director Jake Scott (son of Ridley) can't compensate for Ken Hixon's long slog of a script.

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