.

The Opportunists

Christopher Walken, Donal Logue, Peter McDonald, Vera Farmiga, Cyndi Lauper

Directed by Myles Connell
Rolling Stone: star rating
5 0
Community: star rating
5 0 0
August 11, 2000

The Opportunists is dominated by the weird fascination Christopher Walken exerts as a New York safecracker trying to go straight, but it also gives Cyndi Lauper — where's she been? — a chance to show acting chops maybe you didn't know she had. Perhaps you're still holding Vibes against her. That vile 1988 comedy certainly stalled the singer's film career. Lauper's role isn't much in this modestly made and modestly charming caper flick from writer-director Myles Connell. She plays Sally, a bar owner who loves Vic (Walken) and tries to keep him from getting involved in a heist organized by Michael (the excellent Peter McDonald), a visitor from Ireland who claims to be Vic's cousin. The real fun comes in watching Lauper spar with Walken and hold her own nicely, thank you.

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