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The Boy in the Striped Pajamas

Asa Butterfield, David Thewlis, Rupert Friend

Directed by Mark Herman
Rolling Stone: star rating
5 3
Community: star rating
5 3 0
November 28, 2008

You may not buy into actors playing Nazis with hightoned Brit accents, but the power of this Holocaust tale sneaks up and floors you. Writer-director Mark Herman has adapted John Boyne's novel with admirable restraint. Eight-year-old Bruno (Asa Butterfield) isn't pleased when he and older sister Gretel (Amber Beattie) are forced to leave their friends in Berlin and settle in a remote area where Bruno's commandant father (David Thewlis) has been stationed. The kids and their mother (Vera Farmiga) believe the fence they see outside their window encloses a farm, not a concentration camp. Bruno even ventures out of bounds and meets Shmuel (Jack Scanlon), the boy in striped pajamas behind the fence. They develop a dangerous, covert friendship with devastating results. Delicate allegorical business is being transacted here – a realization of evil seen from a child's point of view. The premise doesn't excuse lapses in logic (the boys would have been spotted instantly), but the power of the story and the performances – young Butterfi eld amazes – is indisputable.

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