.

Source Code

Jake Gyllenhaal, Michelle Monaghan

Directed by Duncan Jones
Rolling Stone: star rating
5 3
Community: star rating
5 3 0
March 31, 2011

Think of Groundhog Day morphing from comedy to thriller and you'll get an idea of the mischief afoot in Source Code, the second film (following Moon) from director Duncan Jones and potent enough to make us soon stop ID'ing Jones as David Bowie's son. A terrific Jake Gyllenhaal powers through the role of Colter Stevens, an Air Force captain recruited by military intelligence (in the persons of Vera Farmiga and Jeffrey Wright) to sit on a Chicago-bound commuter train wired to explode. Sound simple? It isn't.

Peter Travers reviews Source Code in his weekly video series, "At the Movies With Peter Travers"

Colter is part of a covert experiment. That's why he doesn't recognize the hottie (Michelle Monaghan) chatting him up on the train. And that's why he is forced to continuously relive the last eight minutes pre-explosion until he figures out how to stop another bomb from whacking the Windy City. Got it? Doesn't matter. Working from a tight script by Ben Ripley, Jones creates scary, hairy, high-octane tension. Disbelief? Suspended, until the logic lapses kick in later. It's a small price to pay for a ride that starts at wild and accelerates from there.

The Complete Archive: Over 20 Years of Peter Travers' Movie Reviews Now Online

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