.

Something's Gotta Give

Jack Nicholson, Diane Keaton

Directed by Nancy Meyers
Rolling Stone: star rating
5 3
Community: star rating
5 3 0
December 8, 2003

Diane Keaton, looking smashing at fifty-seven, lands her sexiest, wittiest role in years as Erica Barry, a divorced playwright who has learned to do without men. Keaton nails every laugh and nuance in this tart, terrific romantic comedy from writer-director Nancy Meyers. She steals your heart and the movie. It's a pleasure to watch her co-star and pal Jack Nicholson hand her the show.

Nicholson is hilarious as Harry Langer, a Viagra-popping record-company honcho (hip-hop, yet) who prides himself on never dating a babe over thirty — that includes Erica's daughter Marin (delicious Amanda Peet). It's only after Harry suffers a heart attack at Erica's beach house that he starts seeing her with flirty eyes. Even Harry's doctor (a relaxed and warmly funny Keanu Reeves) starts hitting on Erica. And Keaton's expression when she realizes both men are attracted to her is a thing of beauty. Meyers, whose What Women Want is the biggest hit ever directed by a woman, brings sparkle and sting to the party, even if she does let some scenes go on too long and underuses the fine Francis McDormand as Erica's sister. But in an era of dumb farce, Something's Gotta Give is something special.

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