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Separate Lies

Linda Bassett, Rupert Everett, John Neville, Hermione Norris, Emily Watson

Directed by Julian Fellowes
Rolling Stone: star rating
5 3.5
Community: star rating
5 3.5 0
September 8, 2005

Gosford Park screenwriter Julian Fellowes makes a splendid debut as a director with this mesmerizing look at sex, lies and infidelity among the British upper crust. A husband (Tom Wilkinson) peers through a restaurant window and sees his wife (Emily Watson) kissing a man (Rupert Everett). We think we know everything until Fellowes pulls the rug out. When tragedy strikes, all three sides of this erotic triangle get tangled in a web of stinging duplicity and unexpected emotion. Watson and Everett, both superb, bring ferocity and feeling to their roles. But the one you won't forget is Wilkinson (In the Bedroom) in a towering performance of grace and grit that deserves to put him on Oscar's shortlist. Good show.

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