.
David Hoey in 'Scatter My Ashes at Bergdorf's'

Scatter My Ashes at Bergdorf's

Directed by Matthew Miele
Rolling Stone: star rating
5 3.5
Community: star rating
5 3.5 0
May 2, 2013

Is shopping an art form? It is at Bergdorf Goodman, the Manhattan store that's been selling luxury for more than a century. Don't expect Matthew Miele's dazzling doc to be a salute to consumerism. In tracking Bergdorf's from tailor shop to couture mecca, Miele reveals the blood, sweat and financial muscle that go into building a myth. Top designers, from Armani to McQueen, fought to get in. We go to work with Linda Fargo, the fashion director who keeps barbarians outside the gate. Personal shopper Betty Halbreich unleashes her tart tongue on elite stars. And David Hoey and his team design those iconic windows that pop eyes on a global scale. You don't have to be in vogue to enjoy this stylish ride through Bergdorf's. It's a surprise package to die for. Miele and his virtuoso cinematographer, Justin Bare, show how fashion can be aspiration, a model for dreaming the impossible.

prev
Movie Review Main Next

ADD A COMMENT

Community Guidelines »
loading comments

loading comments...

COMMENTS

Sort by:
    Read More

    Movie Reviews

    More Reviews »
    Around the Web
    Powered By ZergNet
    Daily Newsletter

    Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

    Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
    marketing partners.

    X

    We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

    Song Stories

    “Whoomp! (There It Is)”

    Tag Team | 1993

    Cecil Glenn — a.k.a., "D.C." — was a cook at Magic City, a nude dance club in Atlanta, when he first heard women shout "Whoomp — there it is!" Inspired by the party chant, he and partner Steve "Roll'n" Gibson wrote a song around it. Undaunted by label rejections, they borrowed $2,500 from Glenn's parents and pressed 800 singles, which quickly sold out in the Atlanta area. A record deal came soon after. Glenn said the song was meant for positive partying. "If you're going to say 'Whoomp there it is,' and you're doing something negative, we'd rather it not have come out of your mouth."

    More Song Stories entries »
    www.expandtheroom.com