.

Rush Hour 2

Jackie Chan, Chris Tucker

Directed by Brett Ratner
Rolling Stone: star rating
5 0
Community: star rating
5 0 0
August 3, 2001

Rush Hour 2, the last of the summer's action biggies, has a way of reveling in its own kickass cliches that is disarming. The main ingredients are Jackie Chan, the Hong Kong action king, and Chris Tucker, the motormouthed American comic. All director Brett Ratner has to do is stir and serve. The first Rush Hour cocktail, released in 1998, grossed $141 million and conned critics as well as audiences. It brought Chan's Chief Inspector Lee to Los Angeles, where he teamed up with Tucker's LAPD detective James Carter to solve a kidnapping case. Mayhem and laughs ensued. They do again in Rush Hour 2, in which screenwriter Jeff Nathanson contrives to bring Carter to Hong Kong. Where do these ideas come from? Even if big bucks all around is the main motivation for this sequel (Chan got $15 million; Tucker took home $5 million more), the film winds up being faster and funnier than the first time. Chan's acrobatic high jinks play strikingly off of Tucker's wiseass humor. And Ratner, again in the director's chair, lines up villains who don't do much harm — John Lone glowers suavely as Ricky Tan, and Zhang Ziyi, of Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, sizzles as Hu Li, the cutest baddie in any summer film. For a sexy twist, add Roselyn Sanchez as Isabella Molina, a double agent who leaves both Lee and Tucker panting — for good reason. As for the plot, who cares? It's the stunts (catch Chan swinging off the side of a speeding semi), the laughs, and Chan and Tucker busting their humps that make Rush Hour 2 a modest crowd pleaser in a summer of grandiose also-rans. Stay for the outtakes, which add to the ramshackle fun. Come to think of it, the whole film plays like an outtake, and that I do mean as a compliment

prev
Movie Review Main Next

ADD A COMMENT

Community Guidelines »
loading comments

loading comments...

COMMENTS

Sort by:
    Read More

    Movie Reviews

    • Child of God
      star rating
      Well Go USA Entertainment
    • lucy
      star rating
      Universal Pictures
    • star rating
      IFC Films
    More Reviews »
    Around the Web
    Powered By ZergNet
    Daily Newsletter

    Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

    Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
    marketing partners.

    X

    We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

    Song Stories

    “San Francisco Mabel Joy”

    Mickey Newbury | 1969

    A country-folk song of epic proportions, "San Francisco Mabel Joy" tells the tale of a poor Georgia farmboy who wound up in prison after a move to the Bay Area found love turning into tragedy. First released by Mickey Newbury in 1969, it might be more familiar through covers by Waylon Jennings, Joan Baez and Kenny Rogers. "It was a five-minute song written in a two-minute world," Newbury said. "I was told it would never be cut by any artist ... I was told you could not use the term 'redneck' in a song and get it recorded."

    More Song Stories entries »
    www.expandtheroom.com