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Reservoir Dogs

Harvey Keitel, Steve Buscemi, Quentin Tarantino, Chris Penn, Michael Madsen

Directed by Quentin Tarantino
Rolling Stone: star rating
5 4
Community: star rating
5 4 0
September 13, 2002

The heist flick that intro'd Quentin Tarantino gets spiffed up for a two-disc, tenth-anniversary DVD with colors that pop like a whore's lip gloss. It's all here: hoods with color-coded names like Mr. Pink and Mr. White; the gabbing about tipping and Madonna's pussy; the tension generated by showing the before and after but not the heist itself; and more of that infamous sequence in which Michael Madsen's Mr. Blonde cuts off a cop's ear to the tune of "Stuck in the Middle With You." Besides deleted scenes, you get interviews with cast, crew and a few critics (including yours truly). The best bit is a look at the films that competed with Dog at Sundance in 1992. Motormouth Tarantino barks like hell that he didn't win (In the Soup did). Down, boy, you did fine.

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