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Prom

Thomas McDonell, Aimee Teegarden, Nicholas Braun

Directed by Joe Nussbaum
Rolling Stone: star rating
5 2.5
Community: star rating
5 2.5 0
April 28, 2011

Charming innocence is rare these days. You don't even get it on Glee. The bisexual antics of Brittany and Santana would send the characters in Prom into shock therapy. And yet, Prom has its modest delights, chiefly its young cast.

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Aimee Teegarden (Scream 4) makes a scrappy Nova Prescott, the virgin without a prom date. Naturally, she falls for bad boy Jesse Richter (Thomas McDonell), who hates proms and yet is forced by the Katie Wech script to join Nova on the prom committee. Jesse looks amazingly like Johnny Depp, which would make him cool in any school but this one, where the students are mostly clueless. McDonell, recently cast as a younger version of the vampire Depp will play in Dark Shadows, brings an appealingly sly smile to his performance. And Nicholas Braun (Red State) lifts the nerd role with his own scrappy comic zest. Prom, directed with too bland a TV hand by Joe Nussbaum, evaporates as you watch it, but it does go down easy.

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